Pogača (Croatian, Serbian and Bosnian), pogace (Romanian), pogácsa (Hungarian), pagáče (Slovak) or pogacha (Greek: μπουγάτσα ‘bughátsa’, Macedonian and Bulgarian: погача, Turkish: poğaça, Albanian: pogaçe) is a type of bread baked in the ashes of the fireplace, and later on in the oven, similar to focaccia, with which it shares the name (via Byzantine Greek: πογάτσα), found in the cuisines of the Carpathian Basin, the Balkans, and Turkey. It can be leavened or unleavened, but only experienced cooks can make good-quality unleavened pogača, while the pastry with yeast is easier to make. It is generally made from wheat flour, but barley and sometimes rye may be added. It can be stuffed with potatoes, ground beef, or cheese, and have grains and herbs like sesame, black nigella seed, or dried dill in the dough or sprinkled on top.